IMAGING: DIGITAL MAMMOGRAPHY

Your Results

You will receive a letter with the results of your mammogram in about five days. A copy will also be provided to the physician you indicate. Your letter will also indicate your breast density.

ABOUT BREAST DENSITY

Oregon State law SB 420 requires that women be told after a mammogram if they have "dense breast tissue". Women with this type of breast tissue may be at higher risk for breast cancer. Every woman who receives a mammogram at Oregon Imaging Centers (or at any clinic in Oregon) will receive information about her breast density in her mammogram results letter.

If you do have dense breast tissue, your letter will also explain the risks of breast cancer and what to do. It will explain that:

  • Dense breast tissue makes it harder to see small growths, which may be breast cancer.
  • Women with dense breasts may want to have a screening in addition to mammography. Ultrasound and MRI are options for further screening.
  • You should talk to your doctor about this. Each care plan depends on your particular medical history.

If you do not have dense breasts, your letter will indicate this. This is for your information only; no action is necessary.

Q.
What is breast density?
A.
Breast density is the percentage of fibrous and glandular tissue in the breast. The higher the percentage of this type of tissue, the more "dense" the breast. All types are normal.
Q.
If I have dense breasts, should I continue to get an annual mammogram, or do something additional?
A.
Regardless of your breast density you should get a mammogram every year starting at age 40. The American Cancer Society and the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology; among others – all recommend women have annual-mammograms starting at age 40. Mammograms continue to be the best tool to identify breast cancer. If you and your physician choose additional screening mechanisms they will augment your mammogram, not replace it.
Q.
I've never heard of breast density before and I've been having mammograms for years. Why now?
A.
Oregon law SB 420 is new; it took effect January 1, 2014.